Bipolar Disorder Hits the Youngest the Hardest

Linda Searing HealthScoutNews Reporter FRIDAY, Nov. 23 (HealthScoutNews) — People may think small kids don’t generally get as sick as grown-ups. But new research shows that when bipolar disorder, or manic depression, is involved, the exact opposite is true. “The little children that we see have the most severe form of the illness,” says Dr. Barbara Geller, one of the …

Melatonin is Not a Candy

French scientists recently have warned against the indiscriminate use of Melatonin. Despite the fact that Melatonin has been released for public use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration and is available over the counter nation wide, there currently is a total lack of information on the side effects of Melatonin. In Europe, Melatonin has a completely …

Edvard Munch – Fear, Illness and Fame

By Deena Sherman Edvard Munch, best known for his painting, The Scream, was tormented by the tragedies of his childhood – and haunted by the demons of his mind. Munch was born in the capital of Norway, Christiana (now called Oslo) in 1863. His father was a religious fanatic who earned a modest income as a doctor. His mother, 20 …

Clinical Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy

Marc I. Oster, Psy.D., ABPH President-elect, American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (2002) The public often has questions about hypnosis. In spite of being well educated and informed, many people, including professionals, harbor misconceptions about what hypnosis is and is not. The article below will address the most common of questions I’m often asked. What is Clinical Hypnosis? The following definition …

Van Gogh – Mental Illness and Genius

By Deena Sherman Passionate works of art using vibrant colors, thickly applied paint and bold brushstrokes are only half the story of Vincent van Gogh. The other half is the tragedy of a man who often despaired, had a violent temper and mental illness and who eventually committed suicide. The Dutch post-impressionist painter is a star in the world of …

Henri Matisse

By Deena Sherman Henri Matisse is known as one of the greatest 20th century artists, rivaled only perhaps by Picasso, and there is a good reason why. Look at his painting Two Figures Reclining in a Landscape, 1921. It draws the viewer in and invites one to lie down near the two women. Matisse used bold brushstrokes and vibrant shades …

John William Waterhouse

By Deena Sherman John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) usually painted sensual, although some would say superficial, pictures. His colors were rich and his technique was superb. After the Dance (1876), which depicts two young children, is typical. Sleep and His Half-Brother Death (1874) is less usual because of its subject matter and its depth of feeling. Born in Rome to English …

Marc Chagall

By Deena Sherman For a Hasidic Jew born in a Russian village in 1887 to become a world-renowned artist was an almost unimaginable feat. With the exception of a few who were permitted in cities, Jews were forced to live in the so-called Pale of Settlement where pogroms and repression reigned. In Marc Chagall’s traditional community, an artist was a …

Edvard Munch – Fear, Illness and Fame

By Deena Sherman Edvard Munch, best known for his painting, The Scream, was tormented by the tragedies of his childhood – and haunted by the demons of his mind. Munch was born in the capital of Norway, Christiana (now called Oslo) in 1863. His father was a religious fanatic who earned a modest income as a doctor. His mother, 20 …

Van Gogh – Mental Illness and Genius

By Deena Sherman Passionate works of art using vibrant colors, thickly applied paint and bold brushstrokes are only half the story of Vincent van Gogh. The other half is the tragedy of a man who often despaired, had a violent temper and mental illness and who eventually committed suicide. The Dutch post-impressionist painter is a star in the world of …