I routinely teach patients how to self Administered SPG Blocks for TMJ disorders, orofacial pain, Myofascial pain ,Migraines, Cluster headaches, Trigeminal neuralgia and many other conditions.

The most effective treatment for chronic pain in my experience is usually self administraion. This allows the patients to achieve quick relief in the comfort of their own home. Side effects include a feeling of well being, lower BP , decreased stress.

It seems like utilizing SPG Blocks for postdural puncture headache is ideal. SPG Blocks can also help with post-partum depression.

T^his study compared advantages and disadvantages of EBP to SPG Blocks: “Postdural puncture headache is a common complication associated with neuraxial anesthesia and unintentional dural puncture. Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the standard therapy for PDPH but has risks including pain, dural puncture, and infection. Transnasal sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB) has been successfully used to treat migraine, cluster headache, and trigeminal neuralgia. This is a small case series in which SPGB was used to treat PDPH in 3 obstetric patients.”

The study concluded that :”When comparing the risks of a transnasal SPGB, which include bleeding and temporary discomfort, against those of an EBP, which are documented as dural puncture, neurologic complications, bleeding, and infection, it seems reasonable to offer the SPGB before EBP.”

SPG Blocks for treating chronic headaches and migraines is also “easy, safe and cost effective method of treating pain” This autonomic block works on both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves and is very effective treating trigeminal autonomic cephalgias. The Sphenopalatine Ganglion is located on the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve.

I routinely utilize this approach for treating pain in my Highland Park office treating both Chicago patients and long distance patients.

I have recently taught courses in Seattle, buenos Aires and Scottsdale to neuromuscular dentists. This youtube link has several SPG Block Testimonials of my patients. https://www.reddit.com/r/SPGBlocks/

J Clin Anesth. 2016 Nov;34:194-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2016.04.009. Epub 2016 May 11.
Transnasal sphenopalatine ganglion block for the treatment of postdural puncture headache in obstetric patients.
Kent S1, Mehaffey G2.
Author information
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE:
To demonstrate a possible alternative treatment for postdural puncture headache (PDPH).
DESIGN:
Postdural puncture headache is a common complication associated with neuraxial anesthesia and unintentional dural puncture. Epidural blood patch (EBP) is the standard therapy for PDPH but has risks including pain, dural puncture, and infection. Transnasal sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB) has been successfully used to treat migraine, cluster headache, and trigeminal neuralgia. This is a small case series in which SPGB was used to treat PDPH in 3 obstetric patients.
SETTING:
Labor and delivery suite.
PATIENTS:
Three postpartum patients with PDPH were studied. One patient was American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1, and the other 2 were American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 2.
INTERVENTIONS:
Transnasal SPGB using cotton-tipped applicators and 2% viscous lidocaine was performed on all 3 patients.
MEASUREMENTS:
Height, weight, and vital signs were measured on all patients. In addition, the numeric rating scale (0-10) was used to quantify the pain level while in the sitting position preprocedure, immediately postprocedure, 24 hours postprocedure, and 48 hours postprocedure.
MAIN RESULTS:
All 3 patients had significant pain relief following the SPGB without the need for EBP.
CONCLUSIONS:
When comparing the risks of a transnasal SPGB, which include bleeding and temporary discomfort, against those of an EBP, which are documented as dural puncture, neurologic complications, bleeding, and infection, it seems reasonable to offer the SPGB before EBP.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
KEYWORDS:
Postdural puncture headache; Sphenopalatine ganglion block